How young Native Americans built and sustained the #NoDAPL movement

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Tokata Iron Eyes is beaming. Surrounded by journalists, camera crews and activists, the 13-year-old water protector-what she and other demonstrators call themselves-stands in the snow at a camp near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota, wearing a heavy gray coat, a large knitted scarf and thick burgundy mittens.

Just minutes earlier, she and the rest of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe learned that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers won’t grant an easement that would have allowed construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) to cross under Lake Oahe on the Missouri River. For months, Native American activists and allies have argued that the 1,172-mile, $3.8 billion pipeline project would pollute the region’s water supplies and desecrate sacred sites. Read more…

More about Social Media, Dakota Access Pipeline, Standing Rock, Nodapl, and Indigenous Rights

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